Tag Archives: Books

Many Thanks to Ronald T. Kellogg, Author of “The Psychology of Writing”

20 Jan
Ronald Kellogg

Ronald Kellogg, Professor of Psychology

 

One day I was thinking about why some people don’t like to write. I know everyone won’t love it as much as I do, but still, I was curious. So, I decided to do a search on the psychology of writing. Lo and behold, there was actually a book, “The Psychology of Writing” by Ronald T. Kellogg, Professor of Psychology at St. Louis University.

I went to the library to check it out, but I couldn’t bring it home with me because it was a reference book. And they only had one copy. Then, I went to Amazon and learned that the prices ranged from $45 to $125. Geez, I just wanted to borrow it for my research! So, I did the next best thing. I found Mr. Kellogg, whom I had never met before, and made a big request.

The subject of my message read: “You don’t know me but I have a huge request.” I told him about the one book at the library and the prices at Amazon, and then I asked him for a copy of his book. He said yes with the stipulation that I put it in general circulation at the Chicago Public Library. DEAL!

So, today, I would like to thank Mr. Kellogg for the copy of my book, “The Psychology of Writing”, which was received today.

 

 

Image: thinkwritelearn

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Marcie’s Book Review: “How to Write a Sentence and How to Read One”

4 Nov

How to write a sentence - Stanley Fish

No disrespect to Professor Stanley Fish, the author of “How to Write a Sentence and How to Read One,” but this book is too long and too complicated to teach people how to write a sentence.

First of all, a book on how to write a sentence should NOT be 163 pages. That’s even intimidating to a writer like me who love words, sentences and paragraphs.  But, I guess you have to be a highly scholastic student or practitioner of writing to appreciate the content and number of pages. And, you shouldn’t need a dictionary to read about how to write sentences.

Speaking of content, let me share some of the chapter titles with you.

  • The Subordinating Style (Chapter 5) – What does that mean?
  • The Additive Style (Chapter 6) – If I think food, I may get it.
  • The Satiric Style: The Return of Content (Chapter 7) – Are you kidding me????

Oh, the words on the pages get better: “Prepositional phrases”, “past or present participles”, “adverbs”, “nouns” and “adjectives.” Although I know I use those things in my writings and blog posts in any given day, I cannot tell you what the first two terms mean. So, what this means is…I am NOT Smarter than a 5th Grader.

To add insult to injury, check out this statement. They confuse a taxonomy of the parts of a speech with an analysis of a sentence’s logical structure.Riiiightt.

One interesting statement that screamed at me was, “…verbal fluency is the product of hours spent writing about nothing.” This confirms that the more you write, the better you get at speaking. But here’s my concern: Would you make sense??

But the next sentence would really mess you up if  you really wanted to write sentences: “Nonsense sentences – sentences that display a logical arrangement of components, but are without a discernible message – may be the best material.” Not only will you NOT know how to write sentences,  you will sound illogical just like my prior statement did –  even if your words are arranged in a logical manner.

It is not until you reach Chapter 4 that you find out what a good sentence is and how to write one. That is…if you can make it through the first three chapters of big words and long explanations. Yes, that was ONLY three chapters.

Anyhoo, I am going to end here. I was really excited about this book until I saw the number of pages. And the content? Forget it. “How to Write a Sentence and How to Read One” will be gracing the shelves of my local library tomorrow. If Mr. Fisher wrote anything about how to read a sentence, I missed it because of my efforts to understand how to write one.

This book has inspired me on two levels. One, when I write my writing book, I promise it will be 100 pages or less. And two, I will use simple, every day words that aspiring writers, novice writers and more experienced writers can relate to and understand without a dictionary.

If you have read “How to Write A Sentence” and can explain it in laymen terms and simple words, I would love to hear from you.

If You Find This Book, Buy it For Me…I’ll Pay You Back

10 Sep

I found this awesome book at Harold Washington Library and would like to own it, but I don’t want to pay the $25 asking price of Amazon. Therefore, if you see it at a thrift store or used book store, pick it up for me. But don’t pay more than $5 for it. I’ll pay you back.  Thanks!

Let's Get Serious About Teaching Children to Write - Jerral Hicks

 

You’ll Never Run Out of Things to Write

6 Sep

Let's Write SomethingI went to Harold Washington Library to conduct research on topics and resources to develop my upcoming writing workshops. I started my search with “How to Write.” There were over 920 results! This not only gave me a listing of books on the rules of writing, it also gave me writing topics. Do you know I have at least 75 topics to choose from? And none of them were repeats on the list!!

Book reports for students of all ages, romance novels, songs, resumes and cover letters, articles for newspapers and magazines, writing for TV and business correspondence were just a few of the books written.  There were even books on how to write sentences and paragraphs! It was a bit overwhelming.

Luckily for me, I already know which group I am going to target. However, it was great to see ALL of the things that are written.

And for people with no direct writing experience or training, and want to venture into the world of writing, there are loads of options. It’s just a matter of how badly you want it, and how hard you are willing to work. Your options are unlimited.

Just wanted to share my discoveries.

 

Image: fanpop

Be Careful What You Wish For…Even with Books

4 Sep

I absolutely love books. There were two books in particular I really wanted: The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith and The Law of Success by Napoleon Hill.

So, I got what I wanted. And boy… did I get it.

How about The Wealth of Nations has over 1,200 pages and The Law of Success has over 600?! Nation has small print and NO pictures; Success is bigger in size and print, but I’m not sure about pictures.

The mere thought of reading these books is overwhelming. I know I will be so much smarter and enlightened after reading them, but geez!

I  just wanted to share my mild state of shock and to remind you to be careful what you wish for…even with books.

Have you ever desired a book and was shocked by the number of pages? Share your story.