My Feelings After Reading Books by Black Intellectuals

30 Apr

Black History

It is truly an honor to read the works of Frederick Douglass and Ida B. Wells.  Carter G. Woodson is my favorite.  Ok, that’s the extent of my reading for now.  However, these people have left a huge impression on me, and I feel compelled to share what I know with youngsters.  Those coming behind me who are totally ignorant about their Black history.

My challenge: What is the best way to present this message to them? I know it would make a difference.  But, do they care? Do they  even know that there are  great works written about or by people who look like them?  I guess the only way to find out is to get with some youngsters to have these conversations.

I hope to connect with a youth program this summer so I can slip in my knowledge about Black history as I teach them how to  blog, take photos and videos, and be good workers.

Getting back to the original topic.  In addition to being honored, I am left feeling torn.  It’s great to read about the courage and progress of my ancestors, but it’s disheartening to see the state of Black people today.  We’ve digressed despite their efforts.

We attack each other instead of the systems that bind.  The family structure is gone.  That’s what kept the slaves going.  They didn’t have to be blood relatives; they just needed family.  Our communities are no longer communities; they are just neighborhoods with people who live there.  People only look out for themselves.  We do more to tear each other down than to build each other up.  Despite our financial progress, we are still last on the financial food chain.  We seem to be content as consumers, not creators.  We look to the media to determine and validate who we are when the owners of those outlets could care less about us as individuals.

And, who am I? I know I am Marcie and I was born in the United Stated. “They” say I’m African American, but I have yet to step foot on the continent I’m told I’m from.  And, if it is true that I am from Africa, from which country?   I am just like my ancestors.  I guess I know who I am but I don’t know where I’m from.

So, those are my feelings after reading books by African American intellectuals.

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5 Responses to “My Feelings After Reading Books by Black Intellectuals”

  1. what does my name mean May 16, 2010 at 9:17 pm #

    hi wats your myspace page

    • marciewrites May 16, 2010 at 11:07 pm #

      Don’t hang out on MySpace.

  2. Diane McCarthy June 2, 2010 at 8:54 pm #

    Thanks Marcie!! You’re insights are enlightening. I hope you don’t mind, I reblogged them on my site: http://livingleft.wordpress.com.

    I know your words are much more powerful than mine would ever be and since WP makes it so easy now, it was a natural step.

    Have fun with the kids this summer–I’m sure they will be much more informed by the end of the program.

    • marciewrites June 2, 2010 at 10:04 pm #

      Diane, thank you so much for stopping by again. I lost the link to your site. Now, I have you again. I’m so happy. Thank you for sharing my thoughts on black history on your sight. I was just sharing knowledge as I gained it.

      Also, thanks for the words of encouragement. They are really needed at this time. Have a great one!

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. My Feelings After Reading Books by Black Intellectuals (via ) « Living on the Left Means I'm in the Right Side of My Mind - June 2, 2010

    […] It is truly an honor to read the works of Frederick Douglass and Ida B. Wells.  Carter G. Woodson is my favorite.  Ok, that's the extent of my reading for now.  However, these people have left a huge impression on me, and I feel compelled to share what I know with youngsters.  Those coming behind me who are totally ignorant about their Black history. My challenge: What is the best way to present this message to them? I know it would make a differ … Read More […]

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